Health News of 2014-03-28

Stakeholders’ meeting on Ebola virus today

The Ministry of Health will meet its stakeholders today to step up efforts at preventing the highly contagious Ebola virus from entering Ghana. The stakeholders will also step up management initiatives that will be used to contain the disease in an unlikely event.

This follows recent reports about the outbreak and spread of the disease in the West African sub-region and Parliament’s call for a national pre-emptive strategy to contain the growing threat of the deadly Ebola virus which has claimed lives in some West African countries.

The stakeholders will include the Ghana Health Service (GHS), the National Technical Co-ordinating Committee (NTCC), the security agencies, some other ministries, the Ghana Wildlife Society, UNICEF, World Health Organisation (WHO), the National Disaster Management Organisations (NADMO), among other institutions.

The Head of Disease Surveillance at the Ghana Health Service (GHS), Dr Badu Sarkodie, in an interview with the Daily Graphic yesterday in Accra, said that the occurrence and potential endemics required a multi-sectorial approach to address.

He said that explained why the ministry was initiating the stakeholders’ meeting to ensure that a holistic approach and measures were put in place to deal with any eventuality.

According to him, at the meeting, various supposed roles will be mapped out to ensure that there are no lapses in the national strategy.

Background

Outbreaks of Ebola have been reported in parts of West Africa, particularly Guinea and Sierra Leone.

In the March 27, 2012 edition of the Daily Graphic, the Ghana Health Service (GHS) announced that it had instituted a national surveillance system towards the early detection of the Ebola virus in the country.

That, it explained, followed the declaration of a high alert for the disease, which is reported to have been crossing borders within the West African sub-region.

Ghana’s Parliament, at its sitting last Wednesday, also called for a national pre-emptive strategy to contain the growing threat of the deadly Ebola virus which had claimed lives in some West African countries.