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Too much corruption under Akufo-Addo but it was worse under Mahama – Prof Adei

71247212 Prof Stephen Adei

Sat, 9 Apr 2022 Source: www.ghanaweb.com

Prof Stephen Adei, a former rector of the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, GIMPA, has done a corruption assessment between the current and erstwhile John Dramani Mahama government.

According to him, there was a worrying situation that point to the fact that there was too much corruption under the current Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo government.

He cited the recent Transparency International ranking on the Corruption Perception Index to buttress his point, stating that there was clearly more to do in the area of fighting the canker.

“The statistics, the evidence from Transparency International show that corruption has gone up too much. Per their Corruption Perception Index, we are currently hovering around 41, 42 per cent.”

Whiles emphasizing that corruption was bad, he noted that the situation under the John Dramani Mahama administration was worse. “It is too much,” the academician and trained economist said, adding: “It was worse under Mahama”.

Adei, who is also a former Chairman of the National Development Planning Commission (NDPC), told Accra FM: “it has improved a bit under Akufo-Addo but I don’t think it has improved enough to make Ghanaians feel comfortable”.

“So, if they don’t intensify the fight against corruption, we’ll not get anywhere with it.”

He was speaking to Kwame Obeng Sarkodie on Accra100.5FM’s morning show Ghana Yensom on Thursday, 7 April 2022.

According to the 2021 edition of the annual corruption ranking chart by Transparency International, Ghana ranked 73rd out of 180 countries on the Corruption Perception Index, CPI, report released on April 4.

“Ghana’s current performance is still below 50 which is the expected average, thus leaves much to be desired,” the report noted.

Out of 49 African countries ranked, Ghana placed 9th with Senegal, each bagging a score of 43.

Source: www.ghanaweb.com
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