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Are we being fair to President Mahama?

Fri, 20 Dec 2013 Source: Otabil, Kofi

I’ll start by saying that I am not holding brief for President Mahama and the current situation in Ghana. My question is that: Is politics in Ghana being just opposing the ruling government or is it engaging in constructive criticism to develop the country? I asked this question because over a period of time I perceived that most of our politicians just engage in criticism just to discredit the ruling government in order to win power and the vicious cycle continues. Let’s try to analyse the circumstances resulting in President Mahama’s coming into office and his first year in office. On July 24, 2012, the incumbent, President Atta-Mills suddenly passed on to eternal glory and that ushered in President John Mahama. He took over the reins of government with barely 5 months to the general elections. One would argue that he never had the opportunity to have a honeymoon period as accorded most presidents to acclimatise to the unplanned change of status. There comes December 7, 2012 elections and according to the Electoral Commission, President Mahama won the elections, however his joy was cut short when the leadership of the NPP and Nana Addo challenged the authenticity of the results and subsequently filed a suit at the Supreme Court. President Mahama and his government had to endure 8 months of uncertainty as the Supreme Court deliberates on the merits of the election petition filed by the leadership of the NPP. The election results were upheld by the Supreme Court on August 29, 2013 and the presidency of John Mahama was thus validated. After the Supreme Court verdict came the series of alleged corruption scandals with GYEEDA leading the pack. It has been 17 months of unstoppable challenges. My question is: What are we expecting President Mahama to do within the 8 months of election petition uncertainty; the timing of his presidency and the demise of his predecessor? Have we forgotten about the golden rule: Do unto others as you wish others do unto you? Seriously, let’s give him a break, but that is the nature of politics. I want to believe that President Mahama could go on to have one of the best governance if he keeps focus on his developmental agenda and have the inner belief that it can be done. I believe that President Mahama should keep his eyes on the bigger picture that is his long term policies of delivering the 200 SHS project in addition to the other Presidential Priority Projects and also design comprehensive programmes to reduce actual and perceived corruption. It is also important for President Mahama to decipher some of the constructive criticism of the opposition to fine tune his developmental agenda. He’s had the worst start ever and the only alternative is to move forward with a definite purpose to deliver the goodies. He has to dig deep into his reserves because he’s had the opportunity to go through essentially all the political apprenticeship to be where he finds himself today as the number citizen of Ghana. Mr President, you have the opportunity to finish strong since the end justifies the means. Know that majority of Ghanaians wants you to be successful because if you succeed, Ghana also succeeds. God bless our homeland Ghana and make us great and strong!

I’ll start by saying that I am not holding brief for President Mahama and the current situation in Ghana. My question is that: Is politics in Ghana being just opposing the ruling government or is it engaging in constructive criticism to develop the country? I asked this question because over a period of time I perceived that most of our politicians just engage in criticism just to discredit the ruling government in order to win power and the vicious cycle continues. Let’s try to analyse the circumstances resulting in President Mahama’s coming into office and his first year in office. On July 24, 2012, the incumbent, President Atta-Mills suddenly passed on to eternal glory and that ushered in President John Mahama. He took over the reins of government with barely 5 months to the general elections. One would argue that he never had the opportunity to have a honeymoon period as accorded most presidents to acclimatise to the unplanned change of status. There comes December 7, 2012 elections and according to the Electoral Commission, President Mahama won the elections, however his joy was cut short when the leadership of the NPP and Nana Addo challenged the authenticity of the results and subsequently filed a suit at the Supreme Court. President Mahama and his government had to endure 8 months of uncertainty as the Supreme Court deliberates on the merits of the election petition filed by the leadership of the NPP. The election results were upheld by the Supreme Court on August 29, 2013 and the presidency of John Mahama was thus validated. After the Supreme Court verdict came the series of alleged corruption scandals with GYEEDA leading the pack. It has been 17 months of unstoppable challenges. My question is: What are we expecting President Mahama to do within the 8 months of election petition uncertainty; the timing of his presidency and the demise of his predecessor? Have we forgotten about the golden rule: Do unto others as you wish others do unto you? Seriously, let’s give him a break, but that is the nature of politics. I want to believe that President Mahama could go on to have one of the best governance if he keeps focus on his developmental agenda and have the inner belief that it can be done. I believe that President Mahama should keep his eyes on the bigger picture that is his long term policies of delivering the 200 SHS project in addition to the other Presidential Priority Projects and also design comprehensive programmes to reduce actual and perceived corruption. It is also important for President Mahama to decipher some of the constructive criticism of the opposition to fine tune his developmental agenda. He’s had the worst start ever and the only alternative is to move forward with a definite purpose to deliver the goodies. He has to dig deep into his reserves because he’s had the opportunity to go through essentially all the political apprenticeship to be where he finds himself today as the number citizen of Ghana. Mr President, you have the opportunity to finish strong since the end justifies the means. Know that majority of Ghanaians wants you to be successful because if you succeed, Ghana also succeeds. God bless our homeland Ghana and make us great and strong! Writer: Kofi Otabil

Columnist: Otabil, Kofi