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If African leaders treat their citizens well, developed countries will also treat black people well

Mon, 17 May 2021 Source: Joel Savage

In many parts of Europe and the United States of America, Africans or black people are badly treated, facing many challenges in their normal lives due to racism, discrimination, and the deprivation of equal rights and justice.

It’s therefore; very easy to see black people accusing a white man of racism but the important question we have refused to answer is how do African leaders treat the common people? And how do the common Africans treat themselves? What I know is Africans hate themselves more than white people.

Black people often in Africa complain about tribalism and discrimination among tribes, while they accuse the white man of being racist. In Ghana, an Ashanti hates a Fante, they also hate those from the Northern Region of the country.

People from Greater Accra Region (Ga) continuously discriminate against other tribes, while the Fantes also do the same sometimes. In Nigeria, the Yoruba hates and an Igbo man, while in Sierra Leone, the Creoles don’t like the Temne people. That’s the hate games that go around Africa.

In Ghana, during the 2020 elections, some voters were shot, the government ignored the deceased, branding them criminals, yet the same government sent a caution note to the American government over the brutal murder of an African-American, George Floyd.

African leaders forget that the way they treat each other in Africa, reveals that hatred to the advanced world, which they often capitalize on those issues to cause more harm to black people.

How many times I have been attacked and insulted by our own black brothers for writing that HIV/Aids and Ebola have nothing to do with primates, bats, monkeys, bushmeat, poverty, etc, but are biological weapons?

Even though I am not the only writer that has written about the same issues, above all, I travelled from Belgium to meet a scientist in Holland and a medical doctor in Germany, to give me ample evidence about decades of research they have made about man-made diseases in Africa.

At times, I think Africans deserve to suffer because many of them have not the same blood as human beings. They are extremely wicked to the extent that they will try to bring you down if they hate you and they don’t care even if their actions affect the entire continent of Africa.

Black people continue to suffer today because the developed world uses that antagonism, hatred, and division in Africa as a catalyst to cause more harm in Africa.

Apart from malaria, there are no other diseases such as tuberculosis, HIV-Aids, and Ebola in Africa, long before and after our ancestors. Then all of a sudden after independence swept through Africa because of the pain of losing African countries, miracles of unknown diseases started appearing in Africa.

The only people that stood firm to challenge the developed world over those strange diseases were a prominent Ghanaian writer called Ama Atta Aidoo, Thabo Mbeki of South Africa and the Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe but they lost the battle because African leaders can’t win any battle against the US government.

No African leader said anything about the mysterious diseases, including the nodding syndrome that appeared in Africa, yet when Donald Trump called Africa a “Shithole nation,” many African leaders and the people were angry.

The developed world knows that African leaders don’t treat their citizens well, moreover, Africans hate themselves, this has been one of the key factors Africans continue to suffer today.

If we need Africa to move forward, Africans have to change their negative attitudes towards each other. We hate ourselves for various unnecessary reasons.

Even in the field of writing, some tribalistic bigots will hate you because you are better than them or they simply can't write on the same subjects they fear to write.

That is Ghana, we have a long way to go and probably it will take us another six decades to bring a change in that country or never, because tribalism, nepotism, and inefficiency, rule better in Ghana than efficiency.

Columnist: Joel Savage