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12.5 Kg Cocaine Is Small Change For Mahama

Thu, 11 Dec 2014 Source: Baidoo, Philip Kobina

Since 2009, the economy of Ghana has been at the mercy of a group of people who celebrate incompetence. I would have danced a jig if that was the only problem. Besides, they live and breathe corruption. Anything that is conceived by them is fashioned from the template of corruption, and they exude the dark night of decay, which is even anathema to his satanic majesty. The little success that was achieved under President Kufour has been scuttled and sunk beneath the waves together with the hopes and aspirations of the voiceless Ghanaians. Currently, the situation is dire. Unfortunately, it is providing a gapping window for even very intelligent people to welcome Hitler style thinking into their consciousness via the back door. There are very smart people who believe that the deplorable economic conditions we find ourselves is the fault of some of our compatriots who are not pulling their weight. They refuse to make the connection between the current corruption foundation that Ghana sits on, and our anaemic social and economic progress.

Until the cocaine scandal broke, l honestly thought I have seen the worst of this novice government. I was wrong. It appears, Ghana is now being led by Corsican mafia gangsters or a bunch of precocious teenagers. A couple of weeks ago, l read a report that BNI was prevented by a mob from arresting Owusu Bempah. It is alleged he implicated President Mahama in the 12.5 kg cocaine scandal involving a Ghanaian lady at the Heathrow Airport, which I think many will object to. Perhaps, some will argue that the presidency is the embodiment of the nation; therefore, such cheap insinuation should not be countenanced. Though, we all don’t vote for a particular person to occupy that prestigious throne, once the democratic process has legitimised a candidate all our individual intangible values and productive powers are transferred to him to safeguard our hopes and aspirations. For these reason, the institution must be accorded the utmost deference.


Also, a counter argument can be advanced to shore up Bempah’s position. Nevertheless, as much as I share his frustrations and support his right of speech under the constitution, in this instance I think he lacked absolute discretion and intelligence. 12.5 kg of cocaine with a street value of $5m dollars is small change for Mahama. To start with, President Mahama has already landed his harpoon on a big sperm whale. He has not finished sending the succulent bounty to the cauldron, why would he get involved with such a low life and disgraceful business. This is the head of a government that blew $1billion dollars of hard cash on GYEEDA. This is a man who presided over the dismemberment of a national asset in a garage sale, which was bought by a company incorporated under mysterious and suspicious circumstances. Mind you, his brother is the biggest beneficiary of that rotten deal. I am not going to endlessly bore you with some of the scandals you know already. But want to remind you that Mahama does not need this small change. It is pittance; it will make too much noise in his pocket.


Ghana is sinking beneath the waves under the crushing weight of corruption. Dishonesty at our various ports of entry and ghost names is pulling us down inexorably. Sadly, the arm of the government financed handsomely at tax payer’s expense to keep the nation safe is being used as a private security firm. What Owusu Bempah said, view from the worst case scenario, can be categorised as slander. And according to the law, if the President thinks or feels he’s been injured he will have to get the courts to issue summons for him to answer in a court of law. And not using the thugs at the BNI to arrest him from a radio station. It is unconstitutional. This is lawlessness in the highest order.


It is only a handful of people in society who have actually lost their moral compass when it comes to law and order. It is imperative, or maybe in the interest of every member of society to uphold the law, and due respect should be accorded those who we have hired to keep us safe. When that is compromised no one is safe. Even a ruthless criminal wouldn’t like to enjoy his ill-gotten wealth in the midst of chaos. How can the highest security operatives in the country bring themselves this low? Did the President order them, or they acted proactively. This is tantamount to the breakdown of law and order.

I can’t believe that for all the lawlessness in the country, armed robbery, organised swindle of the state by thieves in suit without the balaclava and many more they have the time to go after such a silly case of slander. It is difficult to fathom, after steering the ship of state to the precipice there is no one at the bridge to even coordinate the evacuation. I think we have a government that has adopted the motto each one for himself and God for us all. Of course, I am expecting too much. What can come out of a government whose ranks is filled by people like Fiifi Kwetey who thinks debt is alright when people are complaining about the ballooning national debt. There is nothing wrong in borrowing for capital investment, but any sane mind will raise an eyebrow when the government borrows for consumption. Our national debt is being piled up by chicanery, swindle of the state and pure theft in the case of Woyome, which unfortunately for them came to light. If he is so ignorant about financial history I will give him one example to chew on – the fall of the Roman Empire.


BNI has behaved like an arm of a banana republic, and their action is even worse than Hitler’s Gestapo. They are setting a fatal bad precedence that I fear for my country Ghana. They think they are upholding law and order, but they are rather turning the country into a lawless country. This is not the era of P(NDC); it came to an end more than two decades ago. And if President Mahama cares to know, this is an occupational hazard. There is an Akan saying that when you smell people will spoil the air and blame you for it. The government wreaks so much of corruption every sleight of hand by any member of the public will be credited to their account.


And lastly, this is to the likes of Owusu Bempah. They have to be a bit innovative in their criticism of the President. They have to know that we are dealing with gangsters who have no regard for the laws enshrined in the constitution and our statute books. And for all their chicanery they are very sensitive to their own misdeeds. Attack them with finesse, and leave them no room to wiggle out.


Philip Kobina Baidoo Jnr London baidoo_philip@yahoo.co.uk

Columnist: Baidoo, Philip Kobina