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Health News Sun, 25 Jul 2010

Ghana Health Service seeks collaboration to fight TB

Bolgatanga, July 25, GNA - Dr Koku Awoonor-Williams, Upper East Regional Director of Health Services, has called on the Information Services Department (ISD), to partner Ghana Health Services to embark on public health education on tuberculosis (TB).

He said the region with a population of about 100,000 records only 500 cases of TB every year, which is far below target.

Dr Awoonor-Williams made the call in Bolgatanga when he met with personnel of ISD) drawn from all the nine districts in the region.

The purpose of the meeting was to sensitise the officers to undertake massive public education against tuberculosis, with the aim of getting more people who are affected with the disease to report to health facilities for treatment.

He explained that some people are living with the disease but are ignorant about the symptoms, whilst others have refused treatment because of the stigma attached to TB.

Dr Awoonor-Williams urged the information officers to embark on vigorous educational campaigns against the disease at the community level especially in the most remote areas.

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The Regional TB Co-ordinator, Mr Samuel Angyogdem took the participants through the causes, symptoms, and signs of the disease.

He said a person with TB could within a year infect up to 15 others.

Mr Angyogdem said the disease is curable and called on stakeholders including traditional authorities, politicians and opinion leaders to get actively involved in the campaign to encourage patients to seek treatment.

Mr Nelson Mba, Regional Information officer, tasked the participants to use film shows, public forum and drama among other interventions to educate the people about TB.

He said as information officers it is their duty to educate the public on government policies and programmes to facilitate national development.

Mr Mba said proper education on TB would help reduce the huge amount of money government spends in combating and treating the disease.

Source: GNA