General News of Wed, 12 Sep 201838

Free SHS: Government implementing trouble track, not double track - Yammin implies

Defeated Aspirant for the Regional Chairmanship of the opposition National Democratic Congress (NDC), Joseph Yammin has christened the government’s double track system ‘trouble track.

The NDC, including its leading flagbearer hopeful, former President John Mahama have said they are not against the Free SHS policy in principle, but are for a better implementation plan.

Ealier, Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah a Presidential Aspirant of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) called for a national dialogue on Free Senior High School double-track system involving experts to make contributions to enable it to work better.

Dr Spio Garbrah who is a former education minister, while acknowledging that the system was good, noted that government ought to have had an adequate planning and consultation with all the relevant stakeholders to ensure the implementation of a successful programme.

Mr Spio-Garbrah suggested to the government to invite private sector stakeholders to constructively criticize the policy, offer effective and efficient implementation strategies of the policy and plan to manage the over half a million students that would be expected next year by the new policy.

Using the United State of America as an example, he said although certain things including use of furniture, classroom, tuition, teaching and learning materials were free, boarding and feeding bursary were not free.

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“There are many parents who are willing to pay for their children education so they should be allowed to foot the bills. The government must not feel obliged to give them free food. That is not right because it has brought congestion and will affect the quality of teaching and learning.



“It has brought stress to teachers. Imagine a teacher is teaching as many as 70 students and will have to mark 70 exercise and examination scripts. The other problematic side of the system is that, teachers will not have enough time to interact with students especially those with special needs,” he said.

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