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General News Wed, 3 Jul 2019

Gender Minister reacts to 'Torture Home' saga

Video Archive

Hon Cynthia Mamle Morrison, the Minister responsible for the Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs (MWCA) or Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection (MGCSP), has said that her outfit has been checking the orphanages by visiting them and going there under disguise. This was said in an interview with Tiger Eye PI in her office.

In response to how the ministry would see to the success of a collaboration between her ministry and the orphanages and NGOs and also make them comply with rules and regulations governing the services they render, Hon Cynthia Mamle Morrison said that her outfit has been checking the orphanages by visiting them and going there under disguise.

She explained that when supervision by her ministry is intensified, a lot of the activities by the bad nuts in the NGO and the orphanages in our society could be uncovered and appropriately dealt with.

“Our responsibility is to supervise, since, anybody can decide to set up (an orphanage home), the government has but the private ones together even with the government, we supervise. We have our people who go round to see, sometimes, they go disguised, you’ll never know who that person is”, the minister explained.

She, however, quickly answered that bad heads who do not personally own the organizations they are in charge of would either be removed, suspended or have a supervisor from her ministry attached to them to see to the smooth running of their facilities depending on the gravity of the offences. “Yeah, bad practices, that is what I said, we’ll either take the (school), it depends on the quantum of crime. Or the quantum of this abuse that is going on there. If it is beyond us, we’ll take it from you. We’ll not let you handle children in a certain way. No, we’ll not. They are human beings”, she replied when asked of what will happen to bad heads.

The honorable minister, who took over from Hon Afisa Adjaba after the latter’s resignation from the position, intends to organize certificate orientation sessions for the CEOs and managers of orphanage homes and NGOs to help them effectively run their homes and NGOs without abuse and neglect and also to enable the ministry to properly deal with any of these CEOs and managers who flout on the rules and regulations governing the ministry and its operations. “And then to the people who have homes themselves, should have training and I think that the ministry will have to organize training sessions for those people because we can’t just leave them to do their own thing. Otherwise, after all, it’s my home, I want to do (…), but once you are doing it as a home and you have registered with us, you have to comply by our rules. But we can’t also criticize them if we have not given them training. That is why sometimes I am mild at it because what training have I given them for me to condemn them. So we are going to give them training sessions. They should tell us the reason why they are into this. As a group, everybody will tell us how and why he/she entered into the NGO. Why did you choose to take care of the elderly people? Why did you choose to take care of the physically challenged people? Why did you decide to take care of babies? And all that. They will tell us and we’ll talk about it. So, if you are doing babies, we bring those who are doing babies together, give them training on it and then they are good to go. Give them certificate to show that they have gone through this training. Once a while we’ll do the orientation, then gradually we’ll get there. And I believe that when we do that we’ll get a better system in this country. Even those who don’t even know and are doing things on the blind side, will know that, ‘Oh! I thought I was doing the right thing but now let me be on stream and do the right thing’”, she said

The Member of Parliament for the Agona West Constituency, proposed that there should be a system where people who get pregnant but can’t cater for either the pregnancy or the baby after birth would have their pregnancies and babies taken care of to prevent unnecessary abortions, infant murdering and child neglect in our society. “That is why I said even if somebody is pregnant and she thinks that she can’t take care of the child, you come and tell us, we’ll help you through your pregnancy. Once you have the child and you don’t want the child, we’ll take care of the child for you. And even if you want your child, later on, you’ll let us know that “I can’t, I don’t have money. I am young”. We’ll document it. When you are matured enough and you have a job to do and you want to raise your child, we can (…). That system should be there, that system should be there. So, that nobody kills a child at birth or nobody should have abortion because she thinks she cannot raise the child”, she proposed.

Hon. Morrison also advocated that children should be critically observed and punished appropriately as a punishment that might correct one child might not even be felt by another child.

She also asked the children in the homes should be groomed, trained and taken care of properly as they’ll in the future be the pillars of the homes they were raised. “You should train and take care of these children properly. Tomorrow, they’ll come and help your home to stand because they know that this is where I was raised from. Somebody gave me a good life from this home and today I am who I am but if you take them as you are helping them so you treat them anyhow, that is so wrong”, she added.

She called on all caregivers to train and take proper care of these children in their custody and shouldn't it as if they are helping them so you’ll treat them anyhow. She further said that attitude is wrong as when these children will in the future be the pillars of their homes as they know that this is where they were raised from. She explained that the children, when raised well and have the right training, can even teach their parents and guardians what is right from wrong as well as be willing to give back to the society as they know the society made them who they are. The Honorable Minister ended by using Kofi, the little boy who had his arm amputated as a result of his step-mom inflicting cutlass wound on his arm and leaving it to rot until the timely intervention of the ministry, as an example in her explanation. According to her the little boy wants to become a medical doctor in future as a result of seeing a doctor healed him of his ailment and such a person will definitely give back to the society as he’s realized the society made him who he is. “They’ll tell their parents, “mummy, do you know it’s wrong to use something to hit me?” like my little Kofi whose hand is amputated, just because the mother used a cutlass. And now he’s doing so well. He’s looking so beautiful. I’ll show you his picture. He looks so beautiful. We are just waiting for the prosthesis and then he starts school because I don’t him (…). He’s in another school. We moved him to the school that he’s going to but I don’t want him to go with that. So, we’ll let their parents know. Like Kofi for instance, the love that he’s getting now (…). He says he wants to be a doctor. I said, “why do you want to be a doctor?” He said, “I want to be a doctor to heal”. I’ll heal ailments. So, he knows that the doctor heals because somebody healed him. So, when he grows up, I want him to become what he wants to become. He’ll also help others. So, when we start with the children, and I’ll let the parents who are running the homes know. You should train and take care of these children properly. Tomorrow, they’ll come and help your home to stand because they know that this is where I was raised from. Somebody gave me a good life from this home and today I am who I am but if you take them as you are helping them so you treat them anyhow, that is so wrong”, she ended.





The Interview

The following is the full interview between the honourable minister and Tiger.

Tiger: Thank you, thank you for the opportunity. So, on to my first question, what’s the process if someone wants to start an orphanage or children’s home in Ghana?

Minister: Orphanage, the first thing to do is to come to the ministry, let us know that these are your intentions, you want to set up a home or you want to set up an, yeah, it’s a home, you know. Basically, that’s where the children are going to live so we call it a home. You come to us, we have a department and then you fill out a form and then we know what your intentions are, (we’ll) come and look at the place and then you can start. Because it’s an NGO, anybody has a right to run an organization. The only thing is that, the collaboration should be with us. But more often you’ll realize that people will set up before they even come here. Some people start from a very small knot. They live in a community and they see abandoned children or they see may be children on the street or they see disabled children and they have the desire to help those people. So, immediately they take like one on and then they add up and then maybe somebody will hear of them or somebody will come and see the way the person is treating the children and he feels that “oh! This one is a good one”. So, he or she hears of a child who needs help and then they bring them. So, gradually it becomes like four and five, even before they come here. Some people go as far as may be twenty before they come here because the original intent is not may be to set up a home but the original intent is to help the other children or people. So, that is how it looks like in Ghana.

Tiger: Okay, so, what’s the ministry’s responsibility in terms of “to make it work”?

Minister: Our responsibility is to supervise, since, anybody can decide to set up (an orphanage home), the government has put the private ones together even with the government, we supervise. We have our people who go round to see, sometimes, they go disguised, you’ll never know who that person is. The person can come and say maybe I want to adopt a child or I have somebody who is sick and I want to bring, especially, the homes which take care of the disabled. Or an orphanage, we saw an abandoned child here (and) we are thinking of bringing, they go round and see what is happening. Most of these homes have a school, others also send the children to a school may be nearby, so, they sometimes go to the schools and find out but the supervision is what may, I’ll say should be intensified. So that at least we’ll know exactly what’s happening in every home.

Tiger: Alright, so, since, you assumed office, what have you realized have been some of the challenges?

Minister: The challenges are, they are so many. There are some that we don’t even know where. So, what I have done Is that, we have our records here, they’ve gone round to identify the homes. We’ve done it region by region and district by district because if you take Greater Accra, it’s a big region. You’ll never know what is happening at Ofankor or Osu (or) somewhere. So, we’ve done a district survey and we have a list of all the homes that we have in every region and in that we have our social workers go to those places. My predecessors closed down certain homes, so, now the number has reduced. But the ones that are in operation we have our social workers go and then inspect and see what is going on there. I personally have done just a few since I assumed office. I have done a few because I can’t do it all. But any region that I go to, maybe one or two I go there we get people to give us report of things that are going on well in certain homes and things that are not going on well. But we’ve closed down most of the very bad ones that we think are not in line with our rules and regulations. But it’s just a few ones which have been re-opened that we are monitoring to see whether they’ve gone to their bad practices or things are going on well. But unfortunately we have a lot of people who need help, so, we need even more homes to cater for people.

Tiger: What will you consider as bad practices that will warrant the closing down of a home?

Minister: Overcrowding is one because obviously in every house, now I’m moving from home to house. Every house that we live in, even the most children we can have in our home, not more than ten. Even if it’s thirteen, you have help. So, if you run a home, now we’ve move from (a) house where we all live and we’ve come to a home where you have like sixty or hundred children and your caregivers, the people who attend to those children are less than the number required, especially for those who run a home where we have disabled children. It’s very challenging, especially, when you have autistic children. Even those in the wheelchair, they are controlled. Because they are in the wheelchair, they don’t misbehave that much but children are children, in our various homes where we four or five children, some of them really misbehave. Some of our own children, they really misbehave but if you have a bundle of them and this one is misbehaving and that one is (misbehaving), the tendency that the child doesn’t come from your own womb and you think that you are doing the child a favour, that is something we shouldn’t add when we want to have a home. That we are doing the child a favour because the child did not request to come to where you are. You decided to bring the child and to take care of the child. And when it comes to these homes and NGOs, it is not their pocket money that they use in taking care of those children. A few of them do, voluntarily but most of the time they get the benevolence of people. NGOs come to help, philanthropists come to help, churches go and help. Occasionally, I’ll run to a home and by the time you get there may be there’s a church with a truck full of food for the children. So, the food that they give to the children are from Ghanaians. And not only Ghanaians but even people outside who have a good heart in helping. So, if you bring these children together and we get people to help you, all you need is to love the children in return and then give them a good life. The clothing they wear, most of the time, people bring it to them. The mattresses they sleep on, because somebody will come and visit the home, when he sees the mattress the child is sleeping on and he feels it’s not good, they go and come back with a mattress. I’ll mention this because it is true. Bawjiase Orphanage, fourteen-fifteen years ago, my husband and I used to ply that route to Swedru because my school is in Swedru. So, anytime we are going, we go there and help them out. And then one day we got there and a child was sick and they didn’t have a car to take them. So, we donated a 505 car to them. That was the car I was using. I donated it to the orphanage with my husband. The next time we went there and we were talking to the woman, she was talking about a car that when somebody is sick they don’t have a car to send the child and everything. And I’m like, you don’t have a car here? She said, no. then my husband looked at me, then I told the woman, but we brought you a car? The 505 out there, who brought it to you? So, if we give you a car and you’ve forgotten about a whole car, will you remember about the rice and the clothing that people bring. Then she started giving excuses and since then my love in it fell over because I took some of the children even from her orphanage to my school to care of for free. And on vacation, she was coming back for the children. And I said, why do you want to take them back to the home? Here, I’ve given them a house where they live as home. A house itself, why do you want to add them on? And she is adding them on because of the numbers. Because they are in her register, when people come she’ll tell them, “I have so many children so that when you are bringing donations, you bring so much”. That is what is happening. And so with people like this, but now I think she’s, we are still monitoring and controlling. She’s one of the schools that they tried to close down. So we are still monitoring. So, we have people who are doing a very good job in homes for these unfortunate children. And there are others who are not complying by the rules and regulations of the ministry.

Tiger: … orphanages as a solution and how has that worked in the past?

Minister: Some have worked because if the practices are that bad and you close it down, then you are sure that the person is not going to met out that same thing he did to other children to the new ones that are coming. Other places, I think when we speak to them and when we monitor it can work because there are some homes that go to the extreme of maltreating the children. With a home, the building itself, if the person did not use his or her own pocket money in putting it up the structure and it’s done by corporate people and other NGOs and things, I think we can change the head and put in someone because there are some schools when you close down, it’ll affect the children than to affect the perpetrator. And so with those ones, you look at it. Do we bring a new head? Do we bring somebody from the ministry to attach to the head and supervise for us because the children in there, even my own children that I bear if I maltreat them, the state has a right to take the children from us. The only thing is that, because (in) Ghana we don’t have places to send those children, people get away with (them). But now, I have children that I’ve taken from their parents since I assumed office and we are relocating them and making sure (…). There are parents (that) because of poverty, because of hardship, because of frustration from a husband or from a family member, they met out all their frustration on the children. So, those ones we can take away. So, when it is a home and it is not somebody’s personal property and it’s funded by donors, then we can set that person aside and get someone else because the state can take over. But we don’t want it to be like the ministry want to take over somebody’s property. That is not what we are interested in. We are interested in the children who live in the home. Every child matters to me. And so when we either set you aside or suspend you and see whether when you come back, but we have to get a supervisory role, somebody from our ministry who’ll be placed there to monitor the activities that goes on in the home.

Tiger: How do you think the public can help to make you or is there any role the general public can play to make the work of the ministry and the orphanages (effective)? How can they help? Is there anything the general public can make to make your work effective or better or easier?

Minister: We have a lot of whistleblowers. They let us know what is going on. Somebody will come and tell you, “Can you go to this place? The children are not even taken care of. They are not giving them good food. They are selling the food that people bring to them.” Some of them will tell you, our water bill and electricity, we don’t have enough money and we have enough food so we are trying to sell some to pay for the bills and all those things. We have to go and ascertain and see whether it is true. Whatever they are telling you is true. Maybe it is true. If they have like two hundred bags of rice, should they sleep in darkness? So, if they can sell ten to defray the cost of light or water, fine. But all I’m saying is, the bottom line is the supervisory role. If we monitor and see what is going on, and even the NGOs, most of them we give them tax exemption from this office. And so, I’ve told them anybody that we’ll give you tax exemption, we are going to monitor the thing that you bring into the country and how you’ll disburse it, how you’ll use it and all those things. So, when we supervise, when we watch what they are doing, they will know we are watching them from afar and even so close. (So) they will work well but if there’s nothing and it’s like their own personal thing they are doing, most of them will do it for the fun of it. But I believe that anybody who starts a home or who starts an NGO or an orphanage has the child at heart. I believe strongly that they have the love for the children or they have the love for the elderly or for the particular group of people they are using their NGO for. I believe they have the passion and flair to take care of those people. But maybe along the line, they goofed or along the line when they are overwhelmed by (a) situation, they do certain things. But for the people who take care of the, especially the abandoned children or the street children, they have to know what they are going in for. That is number one. The child who has lived on the street all his life and knows how to buy his own food, they can order takeaway and buy their Malt and drink and everything. And you are taking him to a home where he’s restricted, obviously, there will be challenges. Obviously, he’ll like to have his own way like he used to have in the street. He’s used to fighting, he’s used to hitting. So, when they come here, the orientation should go on. We should let them know that we love you, we care. We are bringing you here to mould your life. We know that, especially, when you see the tendency that he hits this one and the next time he’s hitting that one, you don’t have to hit him back. Even if you have to punish him, let him know that I’m punishing you for this reason. But if you hit him back, he becomes violent because he already knows how to fight. So, if you hit him, if you don’t take care and you are the caretaker he’ll hit you in return. After all you don’t own me. I want to go back to the streets. What can you do? So, he’ll hit you and then once he does that, then your defenses are broken because the other children will know that he doesn’t even own us. We can do what we want. But when you see them as your own children or when you see them as people that you want to reform and you talk to them in a nice way. The punishment can be there. We have different forms of punishment. Yes, I punish my sons. I made them stand in the corner. He came back the next day from school, he greeted me in the room and went to stand in the corner. I said, what are you doing there? He said, yesterday when I misbehaved you asked me to strand there, today I’ll misbehave so I’m going to stand there so that when I misbehave you’ve punished me already. It means he didn’t even feel the punishment. So, you have to look at the child. Every child has a way. Even some children when you look into their eyes and you tell them, “I’m disappointed in you. I thought you were my sweetheart, I thought you were the one who would even, look at what you are doing. Why did you do this? You have really (disappointed me). I’m sad.” That alone can change them. There are other children too that you have to be firm on. So we have to look at all these things. And then to the people who have homes themselves, should have training and I think that the ministry will have to organize training sessions for those people because we can’t just leave them to do their own thing. Otherwise, after all it’s my home, I want to do (…), but once you are doing it as a home and you have registered with us, you have to comply by our rules. But we can’t also criticize them if we have not given them training. That is why sometimes I am mild at it because what training have I given them for me to condemn them. So we are going to give them training sessions. They should tell us the reason why they are into this. As a group, everybody will tell us how and why he/she entered the NGO. Why did you choose to take care of elderly people? Why did you choose to take care of the physically challenged people? Why did you decide to take care of babies? And all that. They will tell us and we’ll talk about it. So, if you are doing babies, we bring those who are doing babies together, give them training on it and then they are good to go. Give them certificate to show that they have gone through this training. Once a while we’ll do the orientation, then gradually we’ll get there. And I believe that when we do that we’ll get a better system in this country. Even those who don’t even know and are doing things on the blind side, will know that, “Oh! I thought I was doing the right thing but now let me be on stream and do the right thing.”

Tiger: This sort of thing, has it happened in the past? Has it been done in the past? Sitting down with them?

Minister: Sitting down with them, I don’t know about my predecessors. May be they’ve done it. I don’t know. I haven’t even checked my records on that. If you have told me I would’ve asked to know what had happened in the past. But this is what my intentions (are). This is what I have to do. If they’ve done it in the past, I’ll add up to it, if it hasn’t been done it I’ll be done.

Tiger: what happens to people who commit bad practices like you said?

Minister: Since I came, I’ve done a few (supervision), I’ve gone (for) a few rounds. I have a few reports. So far, I don’t have the extreme to say that I’m closing the shelter, I’m closing the home down. I have one in mind that I’ll [put somebody from my ministry to supervise. Apart from that one, and anytime I go to a home, I go unannounced. Even the once that belong to (me). Labone, we have a place (that) I go (there). Osu Children’s Home, anytime I go there, it’s unannounced. I did one official job there, that one was (…), but anytime I go to Osu Children’s Home, I go Saturdays, I go Sundays, I go anytime. Time that they are eating, time that they are (…), anytime. I just walk in there. Just to see what is happening and so far I must say that I’m satisfied with what I’m seeing at Osu Children’s Home. For now, that is what belongs to me. Then, I’ve been to Labadi where we have a home there. And also, I went there when the children were playing and I spoke to individuals without their mothers and I think I went to their bedroom and it was okay. It was what I wanted in my estimation.

Tiger: … if you want to add something

Minister: Oh! I just want to encourage more people. We have so many people out there who need help, who need parents and we are going to improve on our adoption system that won’t have so many children gathered at one place like the Osu Children Home. You go there, there are like fifty something babies when there are homes who will want to take children in and give them a good life. So, we are trying to streamline it. We are trying to (…) because of the Hague Convention, we are restricted especially for those who are out of this country but for those who are here that we can monitor, we’ll be so liberal with them that they can come in and then do, you can even foster, even if you are not ready to adopt a child. You can even foster a child. There are beautiful, beautiful babies in there. You can even foster a child. Then a child a good life. Because I believe that when you take a child to your house, it’s better than keeping them in a home. That one, it’s unacceptable in our country. It’s not part of our system, it is not part of our culture. We have a lot of physically children, autistic children, cerebral palsy children at those children’s homes that will amaze you. And for the mothers who have such children, don’t kill them, don’t throw them away. You bring them here. It’s a ministry, they belong to us. If you think you don’t want them, we want them and at least we’ll give them a good life. They are in there. We take care of them. And I tell you, I go there unannounced and all those babies, they look so dressed up in their courts with their toys in there and I’m happy. So. If you have a child and you think that you don’t want that child, we want that child. No child should die because you don’t have money to take care of (him). Just last week, I was listening to the radio and Amasaman and I heard that somebody abandoned a baby and the chief took the baby to the hospital. So, I called Osu Children’s Home, let the Social workers follow and bring the child. That child without a mother, there’s a mother who, maybe you even have your own children but you still want to help. There are people also who do not have and they want children, so that we can give those children (…). We have twins in there whose parents we can’t find, we have to relocate them and give them to other mothers. So, that is what I was saying that for the children, mothers or young girls especially who get pregnant and they feel they can’t take care of the child, even your pregnancy, don’t abort. Let us know, we’ll find a way of taking care of you. When you have the baby and you don’t want the baby, we’ll give the baby to someone. If you think you want the baby but we should hold on with it, we can take care of the child until you are ready to have your child. That is what I want us to have. A system where we can say “No Abortion” because you are afraid to raise a child. Or don’t drop the child in a bin or out because you can’t take care of the child. We would give the child a good life.

Tiger: Is there a process you follow in case there’s a reported cases of bad practices. What exactly happens? I know you said we shouldn’t talk about this video but it’s related to it a bit.

Minister: Yeah, bad practices, that is what I said, we’ll either take the (school), it depends on the quantum of crime. Or the quantum of this abuse that is going on there. If it is beyond us, we’ll take it from you. We’ll not let you handle children in a certain way. No, we’ll not. They are human beings. Once the child is in your tommy, it belongs to you. That is why I said even if somebody is pregnant and she thinks that she can’t take care of the child, you come and tell us, we’ll help you through your pregnancy. Once you have the child and you don’t want the child, we’ll take care of the child for you. And even if you want your child later on, you’ll let us know that “I can’t, I don’t have money. I am young”. We’ll document it. When you are matured enough and you have a job to do and you want to raise your child, we can (…). That system should be there, that system should be there. So, that nobody kills a child at birth or nobody should have abortion because she thinks she cannot raise the child. There are people who are ready to raise your child for you. There are people who are ready to even help you raise your child. I’m speaking from experience. I sit here (and) somebody comes to tell me, “there’s this Kayaye or there’s this young girl who is in my neighborhood, she got pregnant and she couldn’t (…)”. I’ve help her so the child (…). Even now as I speak to you, I have a friend who has a child in the house because the neighbor had a child, a squatter had a child, and she says she sees the child and the child is so malnourished. So, she’s taken over and now the child lives with her. She’s called her “Rebecca”. She has named her after the first lady. My friend. And the baby is still in the house. Last week, they were in Kumasi with the baby but the mother comes to visit the child. When the mother gets a good job to do, she’ll come for her child. She’s just fostering. Helping someone raise a child and there are so many Ghanaians who are ready to help. And when we make it popular and we start doing shows on it, TV shows, you see us with our babies. May be the baby’s face will be covered but you see Aunty Mary has he own children but she’s helping somebody raise, Ghanaians will adopt it and we’ll have a beautiful Ghana where children will have a good life. And those children that we are doing that for, they will grow up and do same for others because they have experienced it. They know that I was raised by this woman who is not even my mother and later gave me back to my mother. And today, I’m able to help my mother because somebody helped me. So, she will also help others. I have a lot of children in my school and anytime I bring a new one, the way they embrace, and they themselves have, they are “mummy’s children” and they are family. I never see those children fight. And I have my Maame Esi. And every time Maame Esi’s hair is a different style. Even the boys are braiding Maame Esi’s hair. Everybody wants to pamper hair. So, when we do that for them, they will also do that for others. So, when we raise that, it’ll change certain things. You see, I believe in grooming the child. In my school, I’ve told them, “Don’t litter”, so, when she’s walking and she sees a plastic bag, she goes down to pick it. Anytime you see the school is littered, then it means they’ve closed from school and then drivers are coming to pick them. And the litter is from the adults. It’s not from the children. So, when we start training children, they will grow and they are coming to take our place. So, I believe that let’s give a good life to the child. After twenty years, you’d see the difference that we’d have because we’ve groomed our children to come and take our place. And they will tell their parents, don’t litter. They’ll tell their parents, “you can’t hit somebody’s child”. They’ll tell their parents, “mummy, do you know it’s wrong to use something to hit me?” like my little Kofi whose hand is amputated, just because the mother used a cutlass. And now he’s doing so well. He’s looking so beautiful. I’ll show you his picture. He looks so beautiful. We are just waiting for the prosthesis and then he starts school because I don’t him (…). He’s in another school. We moved him to the school that he’s going to but I don’t want him to go with that. So, we’ll let their parents know. Like Kofi for instance, the love that he’s getting now (…). He says he wants to be a doctor. I said, “why do you want to be a doctor?” He said, “I want to be a doctor to heal”. I’ll heal ailments. So, he knows that the doctor heals because somebody healed him. So, when he grows up, I want him to become what he wants to become. He’ll also help others. So, when we start with the children, and I’ll let the parents who are running the homes know. You should train and take care of these children properly. Tomorrow, they’ll come and help your home to stand because they know that this is where I was raised from. Somebody gave me a good life from this home and today I am who I am but if you take them as you are helping them so you treat them anyhow, that is so wrong.

Tiger: Thank you so much.

Minister: You are welcome my dear.

Source: thenewcrusadingguideonline.com
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